About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
was the perfect choice because it is arguably the most populated city in syria, it is in northern syria. there is a local part of the city, the countryside as well. the countryside and the city make up the government -- [inaudible] of syria. all of the perl -- the 70% of the cities have been stripped away. the first enacted in the cities is i was hosted by veteran prerevolutionary [inaudible] , that is eerie and citizens going to get it to do what they can. the first thing we did it to her. most of the shops were closed down. to be honest with you, -- by the way, i am using aleppo is a case in point. to be honest, i thought that i would need -- [inaudible] we were very le we were very lesson and surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more sophisticated than i thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a phd, doctor [inaudible name]. they also started the committee on the local administration and the committee on finance making sure that every penny is accounted for. we are working on a number of projects to stabilize the city and help our tra
'malley with the insistence we were ready -- we were ready and resilient. we all said -- punishment on ocean city. that protected $2 billion worth of property because we spend public money to protect private property. that worked. but now we're in to the recovery phase and this, and the response was great. we had heroic people. we were hit by a hurricane, on the shore and coming up our bay all the way to the inner harbor of the port of baltimore and hit by the blizzard in the western part of our state, which is the appalachians. we needed the national guard to respond. we had state troopers and other emergency responders on snow mobiles going in to take care of the elderly and get them out to safety. we did all of that. so now here we are. and now i'm going to just quick word about the shore. you heard what they said. [inaudible] rich in tradition and pride. hard working in -- [inaudible] hit by diesel fuel hit by what they consider unfair government. cash poor, community spirit, my question, and unemployment rate in that area that is in among the highest in the state, think of boot more baltimor
. [inaudible conversations] >> of doctrine and welcome to the city club of cleveland. thank you it shall come the president of city club is. i am delighted to introduce to you today, so when can president effective january 1, ceo of separate ink, and managed health care and insurance provider and administrators serving over 11 million customers in the united states. over the past four years and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debate and implications beyond the health care industry impacting our larger fiscal policy and important social concerns. we are fortunate to have a test today mr. broussard insights on the industry in developing policy. prior to joining humana 2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to yo
and the city of russia. we need to provide families with an opportunity to put their children in kindergartens without wasting -- [inaudible] we need another long-standing problem of russia to resolve and that is the housing issue. this is something that the federal government as well as the regional government should address. thanks to our housing agenda, we have managed to increase the housing credits, which grow at the pace of 20% a year. but we know that housing loans are something that many people with medium and high taxes use, not the rest. and we need to make loans available to broader sections of russian society including technical experts, the academics and so on. we need to make economy class housing available as well as renting opportunities for russia's population. several regions of russia which practice support for rental housing markets. i would like to emphasize in 2014 will fully meet our commitments on providing housing to military personnel. we also need to finish our programs in replacing outdated and shabby housing with new ones. we still have a large number of russian ci
to say the same people. i have tried to say it over the years and i think in the city, people have dismissed as well, you are being a pollyanna or something like that, but i still say it's all the people who never gave up and had every reason to. first in that line would be people like my grandparents. not the cynical people that these unlettered people who never ever quit, who got up every day and believe that even if they didn't make it, those who came after them would. it's almost as though they self sacrificed. they were self-sacrificing, offering for these two boys and the generations to come afterwards. so you know, people say you haven't, i haven't done this or that. you know, i think you and i both have people who gave the last full measure for us and many many ways. so i can't really take too many bows for that. >> there is so much there and over the course of our conversation i hope to reach the declaration of the independence and the last full measure, "the gettysburg address." you mentioned who was then and who wasn't, we and how that changed over time. ike just want to
these famous cities and the populations around them. c-span: why did you want to write about it? >> guest: i was in the way inspired by my first book. in no way one in of my first books that my previous book which was about the gulag system. it represents a continuation of the -- -- that i had after writing the book. one of the things i got interested about was why people went along with it and why did people go along with totalitarian regimes? what is the institutional pressure, why did camp guards do what they were told to do? why does it happen? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii because it's a time when the soviet union was then had reached a kind of height. there was a sort of -- of stalinism and stalinism was created throughouthroughou t the 1920s and 30s and then it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with a clinical theory and an economic theory and a clear ideology. it was exactly at this moment when the red army marched into central europe and began imposing a system on the central european stage. you ca
one of the most attractive and livable cities in america. he worked with the general asystemmably, then-governor ed whitcom to merger the governments of indianapolis and marion county to provide common, essential services more efficiently, a concept then called "unigov." it wasn't without controversy because of dick lugar -- but because of dick lugar -- but because it did lugar's vision, careful careful initiation's ana decisive actions indianapolis model for other cities across thes t nation., but the law took effect in 1970 indianapolis population rose 7 from93 400 to 76,000 to 793,000e moving from the 25th largest city to one of the nations second largest cities literally overnight. when i think of the numerous positive changes in indianapolis overee the past 40 years, i see the fulfillment of the vision ow then mayor dick lugar. now the midwest has a way of producing men and women of sense and decency. not all of us fall in that category. sometimes bear his question buto we do have individuals who have ability to see through the heart of the matter and to resolve and find a wa
. >> chicago was where it was all happening and you know, one of those big cities where people were trying to go to. one of the most fascinating record sources i found were these letters of migrants that one of the journalists covering -- collective. people in the 1900's who are looking for places and the "chicago defender," the black newspaper there played a big role in encouraging the migration and people wrote things like -- looking for a place, this kind of work or that kind of work and one of the letter said letters it struck me which i think i close with was, looking for a place where i can be a man or treated like a man. people thought that in this place it wasn't segregated. not like it was in the south. you could go to integrated schools and you could vote and you could make a real living wage. and there was a huge vibrant social, religious life there. no, i was going to say that when michelle obama's ancestors got there, the south side and she always says she is the south side girl and you are a cell site guy, it looks nothing like it did. her great-grandmother phebe moten johnso
served in berlin, they looked at the clock when he was late coming home for dinner in a city where troops guarded the line between east and west and the rubble of war was fresh. my father knew what he was doing was worth whatever the risk might have been, and so to the foreign personnel we send all over the world today, they want to be accessible to people on the ground. they need to be accessible to people on the ground when they represent our country. they want those people to see and touch the face of america. it's no understatement our dip mats are on the front lines of the most dangerous places. they leave their families behind, miss holidays at home, risk their safety to make the world safer and protect the interests of the country. they don't join the foreign service to be rich, and sadly, many of their names are only learned when a tragedy like benghazi takes place. our diplomats don't wear the uniform, but they swear the same oath as the men and women of our armed forces and their sacrifice is no less important. take note, everybody. as we learned yesterday, the board's report ca
harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is. peter:rerson -- peterson. i want to give you, first, a review of our foundation and why we are supporting the project you're going to hear about today. starting about 30 years ago a
-span's local content vehicle as we look behind the scenes of the literary life of new york's capital city, albany, saturday on booktv and sunday at 5 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> leon panetta reiterated thursday that the serian government would face serious consequences if they used weapons of mass destruction against rebels. that came at a briefing, and the two discussed the impact that automatic spending cuts would have on veterans if no agreement is reached on the so-called fiscal cliff. this is 30 minutes. >> thank you, tommy, and, first, let me thank secretary panetta for the up waiverring support to us here at va, but the men and whim who wear and have worn the uniforms of our nation. our close partnership, this meeting that we had today on their plaf has never been more important than it is today. entering the holiday season, i thank the men and women who spend holidays away from our families deafing the nation, we're all great. for the service and sacrifice. as we discussed little of what we do and what originates here, what we work on originates in dod, and that's w
break fast how as an officer he would spend his weekends in the great city of chicago, the knickerbocker hotel. and he said he would head to the hospital, and he talked one of his fellow hawaiians, whose face had been burned off to downhim on a trip to chicago. the map was embarrassed and didn't think anyone would want a talk to him. but when danny inouye knew he was coming to chicago, he prepared place for them to stop and every one of them greeted senator inouye and his friend in a warm fashion. the story goes on from there and i won't go into the details, but he was a man who was always looking to help someone else. he told how this man who had been so brutally injured in the war, returned to hawaii and raised a family and was dan inouye's friend for life, as so many of us were. i think back as well about senator robert c. byrd's funeral in west virginia. mr. president, it was one of the hottest days i can remember. we were up there just baking in the sun at this memorial service for robert c. byrd. and i had intentionally picked a seat right next to danny inouye. i was taking off my
of you. now you heard that i didn't grow up in a big city like washington d.c. or baltimore or silver spring's or brockville, alexander or atlanta. i grew up on a farm in rural alabama about 50 miles from montgomery. outside of the little place called troy. my father was a sharecropper and farmer. back in 1844 when i was solely for your souls, my father had saved $300 that the $300 he got a one acre land. and on this pharmacy lot of card and coin, tenets, callous and chickens. on the farm that was my responsibility to care for the chickens. then i fell in love bracing chickens like no one else could raise chickens. can i sue the hands of those who know how to raise chickens? let's have a little fun here this afternoon. [inaudible] placed him under the second handedly for three long weeks for the little chicks to hatch. some of you may be saying john lewis, how are you able to do so emplace them from time to time another hand would get on the same nest and there would be some more eggs. good to carry fresh eggs from the eggs. do you follow me? you don't follow me. it's okay. it's all r
of experience in these matters that, i think, is unrivaled in the city. i'll introduce them briefly so they can turn it over to the discussion. i'll lead off with no particular order, james walden speaking first, working in the house of representatives and the senate, serving as the senate hearing committee. he's an adjunct professor in the department of politics in the congressional and presidential studies program at catholic university. he's gotmuy a degree with the university of scot lat, and a ph.d., and authored numerous publications. second speaker is norm, really doesn't need and introduction, writes for with the roll call," and he's an analyst at cbs news, author of several books which they may have read, "the broken branch: how the congress is failing america," "it's worse than it looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." he's been quotedded probably too many times for any data base to collect in one place. in the 1990s, there was an article i was in somewhere quoted, and you were quoted, and your quote was i have no idea. i thought to
in public as so many school committees and city councils around this country raced to do. and for this white house people seem to view it as an inconvenience and annoyance when you bring enough that they're not offering that level of transparency. so i think it is both the difficulty of wrestling agencies to the ground and some sort of lack of commitment at the top two the ideals of transparency, particularly when there is any political downside. one of your colleagues said in one of my stores a few months ago that as soon as you collide with something that has a political downside transparency goes by the wayside. that is essentially what i think has happened in many instances. the transparency folks can often carry the day when it is something that the mainstream press is not really interested in. the moment it gets into the spotlight, that values seems to slip pretty far down on the scale of what the white house said. >> ask you to follow pieces. one has to do with the administration has made new commitments, for example, they reaffirmed the commitments for the office of regulatory -- eve
time. i worked in new york city for about 28 years as a bilingual teacher and a certified credit counselor. if i could just give my personal testimony, i think you may be relevant to the issue here. i studied at hunter city college in new york for a master's degree in counseling. a masters degree, at that time, acquired only 30 credits -- graduate credits. i was in the last class that certified the 30 credits and afterwards it became 38 and now i believe it is 60. my training, i thought, was quite good. we had very experienced and talented professors. the objective was to put on the front lines some trained people to basically just be listening. to have the children referred to us and we have enough training to we could try to help them, or if we felt that the problem was severe enough, we could refer them. we had psychiatrists in new york available. school support teams. and i am now working in florida as is an adjunct professor at the college level. and my feeling is come, and i don't want to be too judgmental, but i think at the community college level and maybe colleges in ge
the holy city, the new jerusalem, and down out of heaven from god, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. and i heard a loud voice from the throne saying, see, the home of god will dwell within as they are god. they will be his people's and god himself will be with them. he will wipe every tear from their eyes. death will be no more. mourning and crying and pain will be no more. for the first things has passed away and the one who was seated on the throne said see, i am making all things new. also he said, write this, for these words are trustworthy and true. then he said to me, it is done. i am the alpha and the omega, the beginning and the end to the thirsty, i will give fodder as a gift from the spring of the water of life, those who conquer will inherit these things and i will be their god and they will be my children. the word of the lord. >> expedia god. -- thanks be to god. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> to irene, ken and jennifer, danny's friend and former colleague, it is an extraordinary honor to be with you in this ma
, and those in union city, new jersey, who have, you know, electorally expressed themselves via the democratic party. that goes to who engaged them when they showed up, and cultivated their political activity and included them in the political activity that was going on at that time no those communities. there's a lot to be said in in cycle and going forward as part of a broader koa litionz, and one -- coalition, and one that i heard time and time again, and republicans love to go back to the reagan quote. the national polls this year should not give you comfort. it's, you know, two-thirds support for abortion, and 60% support for the affordable care act. the -- about 59% for same-sex marriage. this is among hispanics in the national exit poll. that doesn't sound socially conservative to me. >> no. >> and so also, the question, it becomes, and this is more for the people who -- i'm not a -- dangerous thing to say, but the hispanic millennials more like millennials or hispanic millennials like traditional hispanics exist? >> save that thought. dig peeper, and sorry to put you on the spot on thi
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18